Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Differentiated Seating Chart



  • First, distinguish the readiness levels of your students: early readiness (ER), readiness (R), advanced readiness (AR). Early readiness is below grade level, readiness is on grade level and advanced readiness is above grade level.
  • Next, create groups of four [see chart above]. If you prefer students facing forward, simply create a base group of four. Then, have students practice moving desks from partners to groups. This can be done in a matter of seconds.
  • Look at the seating chart above. When students work with shoulder partners, the learning gap is considered because advanced readiness learners are NOT paired with early readiness learners. When students work with face partners, advanced readiness learners are NOT paired with early readiness learners.
  • You’ll also notice that each group of four is assigned a number from 1-4. When using tiered assignments, the teacher can easily ask students to move to the four corners of the room – number ones in one corner, twos in another, etc. Students’ readiness levels are already considered and assignments can easily be disseminated.
  • Seating charts are generally kept for four-six weeks. Be sure that you don’t always have #1s as early readiness students when making new groups or students will figure out your system.
  • After you determine where you’re going to place readiness levels, it’s easier to differentiate for behavior too. Notice the pictures in the diagram – class clowns are separated, etc.

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