Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Gallon Story

This is a fantastic, brain-friendly strategy to help students remember standard measurement conversions found on-line and tweaked by two of Nixa's own amazing teachers, Connie Hunt and Angie McGuirk.

While you're telling the story below, draw the object above.

In the Land of Gallon, there were four giant Queens. Each Queen had a Princess and a Prince. Each Princess and Prince had two children who were twins. The twins were 8 years old.

Objective:
4 quarts = 1 gallon
8 pints = 1 gallon
16 cups = 1 gallon
128 ounces = 1 gallon
2 pints = 1 quart
4 cups = 1 quart

In the Land of Gallon, (Draw the giant “G”) G = gallon

there were four giant Queens. (We say giant Queens so the kids will draw the “Q’s” large enough) Q = quarts

Each Queen had a Princess and a Prince. (Inside each Q draw two “P’s”) P = pints

Each Princess and Prince had two Children, twins. (Inside each P make two “C’s”) C = cups

The twins were 8 years old. (Inside each C write the number “8”) 8 = 8 ozs. in one cup

10 comments:

Lydia Priest said...

I recently saw your gallon graphic and story and was very impressed with both. It is so far superior to the dreadful "gallon guy" that is still floating around in the education world. Yikes ... gallon guy is an alien...can't easily be divided into halves or fourths. I loved the story that you had to explain your Giant G. You may be interested in seeing other graphics that are similar to yours. Please check out my website at www.picthisposters.com to see others, including our version of the Giant G.

Cheryl said...

Lydia,

Thanks so much for the link! A colleague of mine found the story and graphic on-line and adjusted it for her classroom. Do you mind if I include a photo of your poster on my blog with a link to your website?

Thanks again for posting your comment!

~Cheryl

Alia said...

This is wonderful! What variations are there? I heard a special education class used items with texture (cotton balls, pipe cleaners) to create the visual. Any other suggestions?

Anonymous said...

Hi there,

This is a message for the webmaster/admin here at www.cherylsclassroomtips.com.

Can I use some of the information from your post above if I give a backlink back to your site?

Thanks,
Thomas

Cheryl said...

Thomas,

Feel free to share!

:)Cheryl

Anonymous said...

Greetings,

I have a message for the webmaster/admin here at www.cherylsclassroomtips.com.

May I use part of the information from this post above if I give a backlink back to your website?

Thanks,
John

Anonymous said...

absolutely loved this . . . my child got it in less than 10 minutes! and didn't even know she was learning!

Anonymous said...

I used this today with my class and they absolutely loved it! I have always use the G and filled it in with the other letters but adding the story just pulled the kids in so much more! I had a child say, "This is fun!" Another child responded to that by saying, "It's because we aren't really doing math." I just laughed :) Thanks for sharing such a fun story!

Cheryl said...

Thanks for posting! I can't take credit for creating it; whoever did is a genius! :-)

Anonymous said...

My class loves this story! It's a great way to remember capacity..